Author: Darrend Brown

Nadia Ellis Wins the 2020 Distinguished Teaching Award

Professor Nadia Ellis is one of four UC Berkeley faculty members to win the 2020 Distinguished Teaching Award. The Distinguished Teaching Award is the campus’s most prestigious honor for teaching and is intended to recognize individual faculty for sustained performance of excellence in teaching. Above and beyond an individual exemplary class, this kind of sustained excellence in teaching incites intellectual...

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“Quarantine” Book List – Curated by the UC Berkeley English Department

Earlier last week, I reached out to English department faculty members and grad students to gather book recommendations to explore during this time of uncertainty. The selections range from fantastical escapes to tragicomedies, to apocalyptic plots that feel all too relevant to what we are experiencing today.  We hope that this list will inspire you to find comfort in the...

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Musings on “Middle School” Media: Berkeley’s Young Adult Literature Decal

Musings on “Middle School” Media: Berkeley’s Young Adult Literature Decal   by Andrea Aquino   We read Milton’s Paradise Lost, we read Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, we read Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, we read Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice — and the list only goes on. We read countless works, from novels to poetry to drama, as part of...

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Habitually Holloway: In Praise of Poetry

Habitually Holloway: In Praise of Poetry by: Giovanna Lomanto   Even before the event, the room buzzed with anticipation as the awaiting audience waited eagerly for the introductions to begin. The reading as a phenomenon was social, especially in the front end of the night; in the Maude Fife, a flush of chatter greeted me from the far side of...

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Fall 2019 The Pleasures of Allegory and its Significance for an Aspiring Medievalist

Fall 2019 The Pleasures of Allegory and its Significance for an Aspiring Medievalist   By Amanda Styles 2019 EUA Treasurer, English Major, Medieval Studies Minor   Like many American high school students, I think my first conscious experience with allegory, other than on a vocabulary sheet, was with the teaching of George Orwell’s 1945 novel, Animal Farm. In my sophomore...

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Writing in the Digital Age

Vikram Chandra describes the experience of watching one of his novels come to dramatic life in a television series as “surreal.” Already a well-known writer, with two novels and a collection of stories to his name, Chandra was approached in 2014 by Netflix with a proposal to base a series on his second novel, Sacred Games. The novel takes place...

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The Pre-Modern Information Age

Like many young people, Bernardo Hinojosa went to Europe last summer. But rather than backpacking and seeing the sights, Bernardo engaged in a different kind of tourism: he traveled from library to library, looking at medieval manuscripts and documents. As a medievalist in training – he is currently in his fourth year of completing a joint PhD in English and...

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Medieval Sexualities

Last summer, Berkeley senior English major Arielle Moscati got two new library cards and fulfilled a long held dream: she researched her senior thesis in the British Library in London and the Bodleian Library in Oxford. A Los Angeles native, Arielle transferred to Berkeley from community college as a junior. Right away, she found her academic passion: the Middle Ages,...

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The Berkeley Revolution

In the spring semester of 2017, Tessa Rissacher took Prof. Scott Saul’s American Studies H110, “The Bay Area in the Seventies.” It changed her life. Students in the course worked on research projects that became part of an extraordinary website and cultural archive, “The Berkeley Revolution.”  The website traces the social and cultural transformations centered in Berkeley during the 1960s...

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Katie Schramm attends University of California Academic Advising Conference

The University of California Academic Advising Conference is an annual conference aimed at providing professional development to strengthen UC-wide academic advising.  Held by a different UC campus every year, this year’s conference, Expecting the Unexpected: Practical Tools for Advising in a Changing World, was sponsored by UC Santa Cruz and was held in Monterey, California. Below, Undergraduate Adviser Katie Schramm...

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Georgina Kleege performs in “Paramodernities”

The department’s own Georgina Kleege recently took part in an interdisciplinary blend of lecture and dance, Netta Yerushalmy’s “Paramodernities,” at New York Live Arts on March 14th-17th. The New York Live Arts site summarizes the performance this way: “Paramodernities boasts a radical and undefinable rethinking of the canon, involving virtually no music. Each section was created as an independent unit...

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Namwali Serpell in the News

Namwali Serpell has been getting international attention for her recently released novel, The Old Drift. Here is a small sample of reviews: The New York Times Again The New York Times, this review by Salman Rushdie The Times of London Mwebantu The Los Angeles Times The Boston Globe The Guardian You can read an excerpt on Literary Hub. Interest in...

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