Author: lefler

Professor Beth Piatote joins Berkeley English

Beth Piatote joins Berkeley English in Fall 2022 as an Associate Professor. Professor Piatote is a scholar of Native American/Indigenous literature and law; a creative writer of fiction, poetry, plays, and essays; and an Indigenous language revitalization activist/healer, specializing in Nez Perce language and literature. She is the author of Domestic Subjects: Gender, Citizenship, and Law in Native American Literature...

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Graduate Student Poets: Jessica Laser

This piece is the first in a series about graduate student poets in the Department of English at Berkeley. Jessica Laser joined the English Department as a Ph.D. student in Fall 2017. She is the author of Sergei Kuzmich from All Sides (Letter Machine Editions, 2019) and Planet Drill, winner of the Other Futures award and forthcoming this winter from...

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Spring 2023 Classes in Berkeley Academic Guide

To view the department’s Spring 2023 course offerings, please consult the Berkeley Academic Guide via the links below:   Reading and Composition Lower Division Upper Division Graduate All classes   Classes that satisfy the department’s pre-1800 and Literatures in English requirements are noted in the Guide (in the Class Description section of each class):   Literature Before 1800 Literatures in...

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Harmony Holiday named 2022 Holloway Lecturer in the Practice of Poetry

The English Department is thrilled to host Harmony Holiday as the visiting Holloway Lecturer in the Practice of Poetry for the 2022-23 academic year. As Holloway Lecturer, Holiday is teaching a semester-long creative writing workshop this fall and will be offering a featured reading in the Holloway Series. A dancer, curator, archivist, and experimental filmmaker as well as a poet,...

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James Grantham Turner’s The Villa Farnesina: Palace of Venus in Renaissance Rome

Professor James Grantham Turner’s The Villa Farnesina: Palace of Venus in Renaissance Rome (Cambridge University Press, 2022) studies in depth, for the first time in English, a building that has enraptured admirers from Rubens and Fragonard to Goethe and Edith Wharton — a villa that Turner compellingly evokes as the most beautiful dwelling of the Renaissance. Drawing on a treasure...

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Ryan Lackey’s essay forthcoming in Simpsonistas

“Beyond the Process,” an essay by fourth-year English Ph.D. student and recent Simpson fellow Ryan Lackey, will be included in the forthcoming fourth volume of Simpsonistas: Tales from the Simpson Literary Project due out in October 2022. Simpsonistas, which is published annually, collects work by associates of the New Literary Project (formerly the Simpson Literary Project), placing the work of...

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Lauren Groff in Conversation with Ryan Lackey: Thursday, October 13th

The Department of English and the New Literary Project present the winner of the 2022 New Literary Project Joyce Carol Oates Prize   LAUREN GROFF Author of Matrix, Florida, and Fates and Furies in conversation with New Literary Project Simpson Fellow Ryan Lackey October 13, 2022, 6:30 pm Maude Fife Room (Wheeler 315)   Lauren Groff is the author of...

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Shakespeare’s Tragedies

Professor: Kent Puckett Go here to see the course-description page on our website. We’ll read and discuss three of Shakespeare’s tragedies—Hamlet, King Lear, and Antony and Cleopatra—with an eye to how they work as aesthetic objects and how they shed light on the nature of tragedy. In addition to exploring Shakespeare’s sense of the tragic as a response to his own...

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Form and Invention in Native American Literature

Professor: Beth Piatote Go here to see the course-description page on our website. This course explores literary production by Native American/Indigenous writers from the nineteenth century to present, drawing out the various linguistic and literary influences present in the works. We’ll emphasize the foundations of Indigenous languages, literacies, and form, while also analyzing how Native American writers have consistently appropriated...

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Read Along with Berkeley English

If you are like many graduates, your seminars count among your most vivid college memories. We’d like to share that experience with you again by inviting you to read along with the two current courses highlighted below. For each seminar, we provide selected readings and discussion questions, along with an invitation to join an ongoing online discussion and monthly Open...

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An interview with Colleen Lye on After Marx

An interview with Colleen Lye, co-editor of After Marx Here Lindsay Choi — English graduate student and co-coordinator of the Interdisciplinary Marxist Working Group at Cal — interviews Professor Colleen Lye about After Marx: Literature, Theory, and Value in the Twenty-First Century (Cambridge University Press, 2022), a collection of essays which she co-edited with Christopher Nealon. In the resulting interview,...

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Jo Alvarado wins the American Cultures Essay Prize

Berkeley English honors student Jo Alvarado has received the American Cultures Essay Prize for her essay “Loving What Goes Away: Ross Gay’s Gratitude for Loss and Life.” Alvarado’s essay was written in Professor John Alba Cutler’s 166AC course “Racial Joy,” offered in the Department of English this past Spring. Congratulations, Jo! The prizewinning essay responds to a prompt from the...

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Berkeley English ranked #1 graduate program by U.S. News

The English Department has been ranked #1 in U.S. News & World Report’s 2023 national graduate program rankings. The high ranking of the department as a whole resulted from the high ranking of our field specialties, as follows: #1 in American Literature After 1865 #1 in Gender and Literature #2 in 18th Through 20th Century British Literature #2 in African-American...

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Elisa Tamarkin’s Apropos of Something: A History of Irrelevance and Relevance

Professor Elisa Tamarkin’s Apropos of Something: A History of Irrelevance and Relevance (University of Chicago Press, 2022) is released this month. Before 1800 nothing was irrelevant. So argues Elisa Tamarkin’s sweeping meditation on a key shift in consciousness: the arrival of relevance as the means to grasp how something that was once disregarded, unvalued, or lost to us becomes interesting...

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